Bobby MSME

What coolant temperature range your Spark runs at?

8 posts in this topic

I miss the built in coolant temperature display available in my previous car, a Pontiac G5.

 

The engine coolant temperature tells you a lot if engine is running normally. It tell you if the cooling system is performing normal, if you need new coolant or flush. It is like your body temperature. If it is above normal, you have a fever and something is wrong. If it is much below normal, you are suffering hypothermia. 

 

Now that I have a OBDII scanner and the Torq software on my smart phone, I can monitor temperature in the Spark. I am  new owner, so do not yet know what the normal cruising coolant temp should be. My reading is usually 92 C. I do not know if that is high or low or normal, because the car is new.

 

My previous car, Pontiac G5 had built in access to temperature on the display screen. I knew immediately if coolant level was low or when is stuck in bad traffic, I should turn the heater on to cool the engine down a little.

Over 9+ years of driving the G5 I knew exactly what the temp should be based on up slope or cruising. The temp was always close to 189 F = 87.2 C when cruising. Stuck in traffic it jacked up as high as 220 F. 

 

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I need to hook mine up and see how hot it runs, never got curious to know. My malibu used to run at about 190° and the cobalt was pretty hot all the time nearing 230° after a few minutes stuck in traffic.

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My TSTAT was bad, stuck closed, engine could reach 115 C not good, gutted the TSTAT for now and is running between 80 and 96 C usually stays around 80 on a hot  day ac full on, if I stop and go trafficc and not ac it moves 89-96 C if I put AC it drops to 80 C, when my engine was hot  over 100 it rattled and that worried me. Now that it runs cooler no rattle in valve system, I have always used 5-20W full syntetic oil since new, have over 50,000 miles now. these electronic tstat make me wonder.

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6 hours ago, Mr.tozzi said:

I need to hook mine up and see how hot it runs, never got curious to know. My malibu used to run at about 190° and the cobalt was pretty hot all the time nearing 230° after a few minutes stuck in traffic.

Your Cobalt was a close cousin of my previous car, Pontiac G5. Same engine, same body structure. And I vividly remember the temp increased rapidly when caught in heavy traffic ballooning to over 220 very quickly.  

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5 hours ago, mitogt said:

My TSTAT was bad, stuck closed, engine could reach 115 C not good, gutted the TSTAT for now and is running between 80 and 96 C usually stays around 80 on a hot  day ac full on, if I stop and go trafficc and not ac it moves 89-96 C if I put AC it drops to 80 C, when my engine was hot  over 100 it rattled and that worried me. Now that it runs cooler no rattle in valve system, I have always used 5-20W full syntetic oil since new, have over 50,000 miles now. these electronic tstat make me wonder.

A very hot engine can cause pre-ignition which is also known as pinging. It sounds like marbles rattling in a glass bottle. This was more common in the old days of carburetors and no electronic ignition.

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Cruising on the highway at 65mph mine would move between 186*F and 212*F

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I just purchased my 2014. I have a scan Guage II on it. Usually don't 65 it will crop up to 210F them about down to 188/194F and then crop back up again. So the weeks chronic thermostat is not variable. It's either open or closed. I'm new to these electronic thermostats but they seem to work. Ive always felt with the real old school stuff. 

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Normal temps for the 1.2L engine is between 80°C-102°C and the 1.4L engine is just slightly lower. Temps properly top out at 220°F max.

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