Bobby MSME

Spark Member
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    106
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About Bobby MSME

  • Rank
    New Member

Profile Information

  • Region
    U.S. Southern Atlantic
  • Location
    JAX
  • Current Vehicle
    2017 Spark LS

Recent Profile Visitors

112 profile views
  1. All I can tell you is after driving a 2016 (?) Toyota Prius Hatchback yesterday I like my 2017 Spark Hatchback even more.
  2. A very hot engine can cause pre-ignition which is also known as pinging. It sounds like marbles rattling in a glass bottle. This was more common in the old days of carburetors and no electronic ignition.
  3. Your Cobalt was a close cousin of my previous car, Pontiac G5. Same engine, same body structure. And I vividly remember the temp increased rapidly when caught in heavy traffic ballooning to over 220 very quickly.
  4. I miss the built in coolant temperature display available in my previous car, a Pontiac G5. The engine coolant temperature tells you a lot if engine is running normally. It tell you if the cooling system is performing normal, if you need new coolant or flush. It is like your body temperature. If it is above normal, you have a fever and something is wrong. If it is much below normal, you are suffering hypothermia. Now that I have a OBDII scanner and the Torq software on my smart phone, I can monitor temperature in the Spark. I am new owner, so do not yet know what the normal cruising coolant temp should be. My reading is usually 92 C. I do not know if that is high or low or normal, because the car is new. My previous car, Pontiac G5 had built in access to temperature on the display screen. I knew immediately if coolant level was low or when is stuck in bad traffic, I should turn the heater on to cool the engine down a little. Over 9+ years of driving the G5 I knew exactly what the temp should be based on up slope or cruising. The temp was always close to 189 F = 87.2 C when cruising. Stuck in traffic it jacked up as high as 220 F.
  5. I am liking the CVT more every day. If it lasts 70-75k miles without any problems, I am never going back to a geared automatic. Better gas mileage, better acceleration, less engine wear due to lower RPM's for the same vehicle speed, less cost to buy new, smoother operation without the jerks of gear changes, and a sporty feel due to noisier operation when stomping on the gas pedal, no need to tighten bands in a geared automatic, etc.
  6. I am liking the CVT more every day. If it lasts 70-75k miles without any problems, I am never going back to a geared automatic. Better gas mileage, better acceleration, less engine wear due to lower RPM's for the same vehicle speed, less cost to buy new, smoother operation without the jerks of gear changes, and a sporty feel due to noisier operation when stomping on the gas pedal, no need to tighten bands in a geared automatic, etc.
  7. Today I drove a lot of miles on I-95 & I-295 on my Spark 2017 LS with CVT. The transmission performed great going from 0 to 70+MPH. It felt like the car understood exactly my speed demands, and responded positively & smoothly. I don't think I will ever want the geared auto tranny. I am sold on the CVT concept. I do realize the CVT is governed by a computer program and there are many variables the program has to tackle. Such as: Current vehicle speed Current engine RPM Change in position of gas pedal (acceleration demands by driver) How much is the total load on the CVT (passengers+cargo+wind+upgrade/downgrade) Current temperature inside the transmission Is the car brake being applied and how strongly Engine power output based on current condition of engine (well tuned or not) Anyone who has developed complex computer programs, will immediately understand how difficult it is for the CVT computer program to perform ideally under all these conditions. If the CVT performance matches driver's instantaneous demands 97.5% of the time, it is a top rated program. I gladly accept the 2.5% mis-behavior because of the wonderful MPG, smoothness, lack of gear shift jerks, and compact size of the CVT transmission.
  8. In 56 years of driving American cars (GM, Ford & Chrysler) many over 100k miles, and a couple over 150k miles, never had to replace wheel bearings. Either I am a fantastic driver, or just a staid old boring conformist who has never tried to use non-standard tires and wheels or suspension components. I am betting on the latter. However my hat's off to you two, gearhead & blue for having the skill, energy, patience and brains to tackle such jobs which probably are not even your line of work. I am just a mechanical engineer who became pretty good at designing and N/C machining parts for the machines which take more brutal punishment than any other I know of in a factory...cold extrusion metal forming presses, and various other machines for different applications. But I become petrified and paralyzed trying to dis-assemble anything in the power train or suspension components of a car with my own hands.
  9. Be wary of any dealer services beyond what is covered by warranty. As the very knowledgeable folks on this forum point out, have your own mechanic order the tank and install it for you. My 2007 Pontiac G5 gave me flawless service for 9+ years. Never had a engine check light come on in 9+ years, or any other malfunction for that matter. Then I decided it deserves a coolant flush. Dropped it off at the dealer. After I picked up the car, I noticed coolant temp was running 10 degrees higher than during previous 9+ years. I took it back to dealer, and they said this was normal! I told them to make sure there were no air pockets left in the system after coolant flush. So they checked my car, and I drove off. This time the coolant temp was back down to what I had seen for 9+ years! But the story gets worse! Next day I get my first engine check light! I plugged in the OBD II scanner and it said misfire in engine #1. My guess is, but I can not prove it, that they overheated my engine during coolant flush, causing carbon deposits on exhaust valves. So, back to the dealer. Again they explained it is normal to get carbon deposits after 9 years. Yeah right! The next day after coolant flush? Moral of the story is, dealer mechanics are not rocket scientists!! You are better off finding a repair shop you can trust when warranty expires.
  10. I lived in WA state before moving to FL last year. The sales tax in WA was pretty high, 9+% neighborhood. I love Florida taxes. 6% sales tax, and property tax on my $110k condo is less than $600/year because I am senior age and live in the property. In WA property tax was a killer. Back to the Spark 2017 LS, I bought it a few weeks back, and loving it. The CVT tranny is smooth with superb acceleration for such a small 1.4 liter engine. At 60 mph, the engine is under 2000 rpm. The only issue I found with the CVT is when I am slowing down to almost a stop due to slow traffic ahead, moving at about 5 mph, but then traffic starts to move again, and I do not need to come to a complete stop, the CVT will not shift equivalent to 1st gear, and therefore it rev's up a bit due to lack of 1st gear torque. It is obviously a programming issue, but nothing scary. If the car slows down to under 2 mph, then the CVT seems to shift into equivalent of 1st gear, with strong torque available. Other than that the CVT behaves very much in tune with the driver's demand. Have fun with your new 2017 Spark with manual tranny . It should be a gas to drive
  11. Try using Sea Foam additive or similar product available at Walmart & other auto part stores. Dirty valves with carbon deposits could be one of the causes. That causes lower compression, misfires and rough idling. I am assuming your car is mechanically & electrically in good shape. If that does not solve the problem, your car will need a valve job. $1500-$2500.
  12. Best MPG is 99 with my foot off the gas pedal.... But seriously I am averaging 36 mpg in combined hi-way/town driving.
  13. Your A/C problem could simply be lack of enough Freon (or whatever fluid is used in your car). If car is past bumper to bumper warranty, GM or dealer will not repair it free. Freon leaks out from all A/C units depending on how good seals are. That is not considered a repair. It is a maintenance item. Same as air pressure in tires. Seals tend to last better if A/C is run briefly once a month. I would stop by a repair shop who services Auto A/C.
  14. Completely agree. I have done my own oil changes for 50+ years! It is a bit messy and takes 30-45 minutes, but is not that hard. The worst part is crawling under the car to loosen oil drain plug, in a safe manner, using a reliable jack. On the Spark, the oil filter seems easily accessible, which is good.
  15. Fate of another 2013 Spark....